Archives for Vetrofond

Torso Beads by Joy Munshower

One of our customers, Joy Munshower, posted some wonderful torso beads made with the Effetre glass rod colors ( Sunset, Alexandrite, Green Tea, Earth, Dark Ivory, and Neptune) and Vetrofond glass rod ( Topaz ODD ). They were such great examples of these colors I thought I would share them in this blog. The murrini used were by Donna Millard   I would like to see this bead in person because Effetre Alexandrite shifts hue slightly with different light. This Green Tea bead looks like it was sculpted out of a Marble. For more images check out her Facebook page.
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Categories: 104 COE Glass Review, Flameworking 104 Glass, Lampworking, and lampworking techniques.

Glass Colors I Like and Why (10-15-10)

The new shipment of “Odd” neutral colors from Vetrofond are a fabulous base color for working with many of those expensive silvered glass colors made by Double Helix, Trautman Art Glass and Precision 104.
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Categories: 104 COE Glass Review, Flameworking 104 Glass, Lampworking, and Promotion.

A Bonanza of New Glass Colors by the Big Three for Lampworkers (6-10-10)

Spring has brought an amazing number of new glass colors from the three big glass factories that supply Frantz Art Glass & Supply.
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Categories: 104 COE Glass Review, Flameworking 104 Glass, and Lampworking.

More about Silver Glass Colors

I recently paid a visit to Double Helix Glassworks to ask Jed (glass maker extraordinaire) some questions on how to get good color out of some of his more challenging palette. I bet I am not the only person who finds using the new silvered glass colors a little frustrating sometimes.  I look online and see fabulous beads that some people managed to make out of the silvered glass colors and say to myself, I ought to try that.  It is a bummer when I do try colors like Luna, Pandora and Khaos, to mention a few and all I
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Categories: 104 COE Glass Review, lampworking techniques, and Silver Glass Colors.

Need More Information and Inspiration?

When you click on the Web Gallery, a web page appears that shows links for the three different sections of the web gallery that are Focal Beads, Spacer Beads and Strands. Click on one of the choices and you will be taken to a page of thumb (small images) to pick from. When you click on a thumb image, a large image will appear with a list of the different glass colors that were used in that bead and the glass colors are linked to the Frantz Art Glass web page for easy purchase, plus pertinent information on how the bead was made.
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Categories: Flameworking 104 Glass, Lampworking, and lampworking techniques.

Tips and Techniques #3 – Making Your Own Custom Frit

I have noticed that there are a lot of people who like to use frit in their lampworking projects and custom frit blends have been really popular for a long time.  If you are one of these folks that like to use frit in their hot glass projects but would like to try some unusual frit or personal blends, there is a simple way to make small amount of frit for your own personal use. The things you need for Making Your Own Custom Frit : Torch Pair of lampworking glasses Pair of big mashers Jar of cold water Small
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Categories: Flameworking 104 Glass, Lampworking, lampworking techniques, and Silver Glass Colors.

Break creative block and help people relate to your artwork.

Do you ever run into a creative road block? Do you ever feel like you're in a color rut? Don't feel alone all artists do. We just need some inspiration. One thing you can do to get past that creative block is to get inspiration from association.
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Categories: Flameworking 104 Glass, Lampworking, lampworking techniques, and Promotion.

Tools for Shaping Flameworked Objects

Flameworking shaping tools is an interesting subject that comes up often in conversations with other artists who like to work in hot glass.  There were no tools to speak of when I started flameworking and I find it delightful that a cornucopia of tools have become available to flameworkers over the past 20 years. Here are the Tools for Shaping Flameworked Objects. When I first started flameworking I only had a graphite marver that I acquired from a scientific borosilicate tool supplier.  I started out with a 5″ x 3″ graphite marver, thinking that bigger is better but I found
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Categories: 104 COE Glass Review, Flameworking 104 Glass, Lampworking, and lampworking techniques.